Donn Salisbury, Catriona Simmons, Josh Henderson & Kat Jurkiewic describe their work:

Colour has the power to influence mood, energy and spatial perception. Control of light and colour in modern architecture can be achieved simply by the push of a button or swipe of a hand. But can you transform space as well as colour and light?
Polka Kucha takes this thought, stripping our understanding of these elements back to basics and recreating it in an almost nostalgic fashion. Compression and expansion is driven by the occupant, manually, generating a unique and personal experience of space, light and colour. No 'smart' controls, no motors, no programed theatrics - just pure hand driven refinement of your immediate environment. The experience of pulling a rope by hand provides a unique intimacy to the changing spatial experience as well as an insight into the spectral nature of coloured light, an experience which has over time been somewhat numbed by modern technology.

1. Which came first – concept or location? How much does the location influence your creativity? Concept - but the location just seemed to work perfectly.

 

2. What was your role & who did you collaborate with? What roles did they play?

See last email for credits. Grimshaw and ourselves worked up the concept. Josh and Kat from Grimshaw undertook most of the fabrication and construction, which was a massive task for such a structure.  Credits: Electrolight, Grimshaw Architects, Xenian, Star Electrical, Partridge Engineering, Felicetti Structural Engineers

 

3. How did you come to be a lighting installation artist? Are you working on any projects not for Vivid, you’d like to share?

Lots - art collaborations with several artists around the country at the moment. Perth seems to be brimming with public art opportunities currently, with Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney still kicking on.

 

4. Where do you see future for independent lighting sculptures & installations taking you? Experimentation and inspiration for ourselves and the lighting design community, but at the same time, recognition for what light can create as a medium.